South London’s Best Historic Landmarks

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Though it might be a little more of a trek than other areas of London, guests staying at hotels near Paddington Station should not overlook South London on a first time trip to the city. Full of relaxing parks, independent shopping destinations and truly diverse culture, the area of South London offers a vast array of districts for you to explore. Whether staying for a weekend or a month, areas like Brixton and Clapham differ in their personalities but are much more than just city suburbs.

This blog will outline some of the best historic attractions in this diverse and expansive area of the city for adventurous guests of London hotel deal special offers. From nightlife hotspots to mysterious sculptures, the many aspects of south and southeast London can tell you a lot about the city’s culture, art and organisation. 

Greenwich Maritime Museum

Greenwich Maritime Museum

Located on the former Royal Hospital School site – incidentally a popular location for international movies – the Greenwich Maritime Museum explores the seafaring history of London and the UK, exploring everything from sailing technology to the role of London as a port and dock as far back as the Roman era. The building itself holds hundreds of years of history too, spanning back to the 17th century when it was developed as the Royal Hospital School, intended to educate the orphans of naval officers and sailors lost at sea. The Greenwich Maritime Museum was opened in 1937 and its permanent galleries are free of charge.

Greenwich Observatory

Greenwich Observatory

Located just a short (but hilly) walk from the Greenwich Maritime Museum, the Greenwich Observatory is situated in Greenwich Park and due to the Greenwich Meridian line striking through it, lent its name to the timekeeping and navigational mean point. The observatory has recently installed an AMAT telescope, so the museum, which has for the latter half of the twentieth century acted mostly as a science and history exhibition space, can now legitimately call itself an observatory again as well. 

All Saints Church

Brixton Windmill

The spire of this Garde II listed Anglican Parish can be seen from across the Blackheath Fields and is an iconic emblem of the southeast London area. The church itself dates back to 1854 and symbolises the historic community that has existed on Blackheath for hundreds of years. Make sure to visit the historic village of Blackheath whilst you’re here, the independent eateries here are enough to rival that of the best restaurants near Paddington.

Brixton Windmill

Tate Modern

An iconic emblem of the Brixton area, this beautiful windmill has stood on the upper fields of Brixton since 1816. The windmill originally named Ashby’s Mill, stayed in use as wind, water and then engine mill up until 1934 to produce flour. A decade ago, the windmill underwent a major renovation and is now open to the public as a museum.

Crystal Palace Dinosaurs

Built in the Victorian era, the anatomically incorrect dinosaurs found around the ponds of Crystal Palace Park are beautiful examples of naive Victorian science. The park is well worth a walk too, having once been home to the Crystal Palace after it was transferred to south London from the Great Exhibition.

Tate Modern

Easy to reach for guests at the Chilworth Paddington, the Tate Modern is a Southbank based art gallery housed in a former power station. The expansive hall holds seven floors of cafes, screening rooms and gallery spaces and focuses on art from the 20th and 21st centuries.